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Guide Legend and Use

In this Chemical Compatibility guide, Harrington has provided a single resource of non-metallic and high-purity steel piping products.  The chemicals listed are classified alphabetically according to their most common designation. Further descriptions include trivial/common names, and some trade names. 

Instructions and example:

Legend

Plastic Pipe & Elastomeric Materials

Temperature (°F) = recommended for use at or below this temperature (results shown in green)

X = Unsuitable, do not use   (results shown in red)

C= Caution, actual testing necessary (see note displayed for detail) (results shown in yellow)

- = Insufficient data, testing under actual use conditions required

* = See Note displayed for further explanation

Seals (Carbon & Ceramic)

A = Acceptable  (results shown in green)

NR = Not Recommended (results shown in red)

 ­­– = No Data, testing under actual use conditions required

High Purity Metallic Tubing

A = Excellent (results shown in green)

B = Good, minor effect  (results shown in lighter shade green)

C = Fair, needs further testing under actual conditions (results shown in yellow)

X = Not Recommended (results shown in red)

- = Insufficient data, testing under actual use conditions required

NOTE: an A-rating for metals indicates that the rate of penetration is < 2 mils per year; a B-rating indicates rate of penetration < 20 mils per year; a C-rating indicates rate of penetration <50 mils per year.

How to Select the Correct Material:

1. Locate the specific chemical in the guide.

2. Select the material with a maximum use temperature that matches or exceeds the need. The Harrington philosophy has always been to suggest the least costly material that will do the job.

3. Where a material or elastomer appears to be marginal compared to the requirements, place a call to our HarringtonTechnical staff for additional recommendations.


Examples:

1. Methylene chloride: in the table PVDF, Halar, or PTFE are the only materials suitable. Carbon steel works well for chlorinated hydrocarbons of this sort, and that would be our choice unless there was another reason to justify the higher cost of PVDF, PTFE, or Halar.

2. Sodium hypochlorite, 15% at 100°F: PVC is good to 100°F and is the least expensive of the materials available, however, you must use 724 CPVC cement for this and caustic applications.

3. For nitric acid, 40% at ambient temperature: the tables recommend either CPVC or polypropylene at 73°F. In most cases, CPVC will be the economical choice. Note that PVDF is rated for higher temperature use.

Note: The ratings shown for carbon and ceramic pump seals are approximate.
Please contact your local Harrington service center for a recommendation on your specific application.

Please contact your local Harrington service center for a recommendation on your specific application (see store finder).